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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
Since the start of our lockdown period, the first face-to-face meeting of the committee was held yesterday (socially distanced, of course!). 
Future opening plans are being discussed and will be publicised as soon as they are finalised.
The work on new displays is still going on - one of which is the Womens display in which a local piano teacher, Jeanie Peter is featured. Below is the plaque which would probably have been displayed on her front fence and theres a lovely photo of her with her students c1928. Miss Peter was born in 1884 and lived until 1973, so perhaps some of our Facebook watchers were taught by her. If so, wed love to hear from you.Image attachment

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Lovely of you all to share your memories of Miss Peter with us. And thanks to Glynis Cummins for sending us the pics in the first place. We were saying on Tuesday that we must polish up the plaque. Love the phone number: 111 😊

We lived in the unit next door to her when we were first married she was a nice lady

Yes I was taught piano by Miss Peters. I walked over the road to her lessons. She was a lovely lady.I remember she wrote on our music with grey lead pencil. She always put the tip of pencil in her mouth before she wrote anything. That always stuck in my mind.

She lived on the corner of Ferguson and Harrison Sts. That sign was on her front fence she polished it regularly. Her garden was always immaculate. She would be mortified if she saw it now. I remember watching her back her little maroon mini over her garbage bin one day and she then drove off up to Manifold Street.

Standing far left is little Nellie Cummins, later Nellie Henry. My husband, her nephew, has a copy of this photo too.Her parents were Jack and Florence (Weatherhead) Cummins and her brothers were Harold and Bob Cummins. Her husband was Roy Henry.

I was taught by Miss Peters I can remember she had a little stick if you hit the wrong key you got a tap with it that was in the 60’s

Ross Murrihy was this your teacher?

Omg I forgot that lol

Yes. My sisters & I were taught by Miss Peters. I played piano for a while then learnt the piano accordion. This was in the 50’s

WORK GOES ON BEHIND THE SCENES
Over the past few weeks, while the community has been in lockdown, dedicated members of the Historical Society Executive have been quietly using the time to re-design our displays and working areas.
A display focussing on the histories of women is in the process of being completed in one corner, another area is given over to our hospital records and stories, and our Aboriginal display is being updated and re-organised.
We are all looking forward to the time when we can open to the public again and show you the results of all the hard work.Image attachment

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Hi everyone ... great to have this special Lockdown time in many ways 😉💖‼️

Wish I lived closer to view it. My ancestors lived at 68 Manifold street in the 1800’s.

Great work guys 🙂

EVEN IN LOCKDOWN, WE BRING YOU THE NEWS!
Despite all the current restrictions due to the Covid19 problem,  the intrepid Editorial Team has managed to produce the April edition of Past Matters. Our main subject for this edition is based on a couple of previous epidemics - diphtheria and polio - and stories about the Camperdown Infectious Diseases Hospital. It seems to be appropriate for the times!
Do you wish you could read the whole edition? You can if you become a member! And you can join on our Website: www.camperdownhistory.org.au
CDHS sends best wishes to all our FB readers - stay safe and warm and well.

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Sorry Beth. We'll check.

I haven't received an emailed copy yet. Have they been sent or on the way? Looking forward to it!

GOATS INVADE CAMPERDOWN!
Fortunately, unlike the Welsh town in the news recently, this invasion took place in 1885.
Apologies for the length of this posting but it's word-for-word from the Chronicle of that year and too good not to use.
Camperdown Chronicle, Wednesday 2 December 1885.
THE GOAT NUISANCE (to the editor)
Sir,
It is within my recollection that some years ago the township of Camperdown was overrun by herds of goats and the nuisance increased to such an extent that those residents having gardens bitterly complained of the Shire Council for tolerating them in the streets. The Post Office lobby was transformed into a goat corral, from which emanated hideous groans and distracting goat language, disturbing the nightly repose of the then postmaster who, in self-defence, constructed and fixed up an ingenious weapon of offence, which went under the name of a "chevaux de frize". This weapon, however, upon trial had its disadvantages, viz. that the groans became louder, deeper and more prolonged, also that belated letter writers in posting, incurred the serious risk of being run through the pit of the stomach. Eventually, two worthy citizens who having suffered cruel persecutions and having something to protect, tried the old fashioned plan of powder and shot with complete success. The shire councillors also were aroused from their passive apathy and issued an edict to their herdsman to have a field day in a similar manner, hence for several years, not one goat has been seen in the principal streets. I notice, however, that “billy” and his mates are again to the front in Manifold Street and may be observed playing hide and seek around the churns and other works of art exhibited for sale in front of Messrs. T and V Down’s store. This simply means the beginning of another goat era and, if permitted to continue and increase, will develop into old-time sores. I venture to say that not one of these goats are entered in the herdsman’s books, and is it, therefore, a matter of surprise that those having milch cows entered, complain that the grass is eaten by stock belonging to people who pay nothing for it? With your permission, I desire to call the attention of the herdsman to this. Here is a splendid opportunity for his not only earning his 75 per cent of the commonage fees, but also the gratitude of all in preventing verandah sheltered business premises and private residences being converted into goat pens.
Yours etc.,
OBSERVER
NOTE: Chevaux de frize: a row of spikes or broken glass set as an obstacle on top of a wall.
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GOATS INVADE CAMPERDOWN!
Fortunately, unlike the Welsh town in the news recently, this invasion took place in 1885.
Apologies for the length of this posting but its word-for-word from the Chronicle of that year and too good not to use.
Camperdown Chronicle, Wednesday 2 December 1885.
THE GOAT NUISANCE   (to the editor)
Sir, 
It is within my recollection that some years ago the township of Camperdown was overrun by herds of goats and the nuisance increased to such an extent that those residents having gardens bitterly complained of the Shire Council for tolerating them in the streets. The Post Office lobby was transformed into a goat corral, from which emanated hideous groans and distracting goat language, disturbing the nightly repose of the then postmaster who, in self-defence, constructed and fixed up an ingenious weapon of offence, which went under the name of a chevaux de frize. This weapon, however, upon trial had its disadvantages, viz. that the groans became louder, deeper and more prolonged, also that belated letter writers in posting, incurred the serious risk of being run through the pit of the stomach. Eventually, two worthy citizens who having suffered cruel persecutions and having something to protect, tried the old fashioned plan of powder and shot with complete success. The shire councillors also were aroused from their passive apathy and issued an edict to their herdsman to have a field day in a similar manner, hence for several years, not one goat has been seen in the principal streets. I notice, however, that “billy” and his mates are again to the front in Manifold Street and may be observed playing hide and seek around the churns and other works of art exhibited for sale in front of Messrs. T and V Down’s store. This simply means the beginning of another goat era and, if permitted to continue and increase, will develop into old-time sores. I venture to say that not one of these goats are entered in the herdsman’s books, and is it, therefore, a matter of surprise that those having milch cows entered, complain that the grass is eaten by stock belonging to people who pay nothing for it? With your permission, I desire to call the attention of the herdsman to this. Here is a splendid opportunity for his not only earning his 75 per cent of the commonage fees, but also the gratitude of all in preventing verandah sheltered business premises and private residences being converted into goat pens.
Yours etc.,
OBSERVER
NOTE: Chevaux de frize: a row of spikes or broken glass set as an obstacle on top of a wall.Image attachment

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Looks like they are chomping on Dads garden at the church lol

Great article

Brenda Tolland

UPDATE ON THE INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL QUESTION
The original photo has been examined carefully and it turns out that its only the chimney thats made of brick. The walls each side are actually timber - even though it LOOKS like brick.
 AND, the writing underneath says: Camperdown & District Isolation Hospital. So, as far as we know, the problem is solved.
An extension was built in 1935 which was made of timber and iron (corrugated iron?) and was the only part left standing when fire destroyed the original building in 1951. The timber extension stayed on the site for a number of years until it was removed.
Thanks to those whove made comments and tried to help.

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Where was it located?

What was the Isolation for

Verna Regan you were right, it was timber

Historical detective research work... Facebook and internet and sharp minds 😂🌺

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