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I am sure you are all aware how difficult this year has been in many ways, especially for holding community events.

The 'Milking our Memories' event with Pat Walsh, planned for Sunday 3rd October is the latest in a long list to be postponed.
We are now hoping it can take place in the first half of next year.

The Aboriginal History and Culture weekend, planned for August, has been postponed, likely until early next year.

The Robert Burns Festival postponed from July to September, will now be held on the 1st to 3rd July, 2022.

Camperdown Secondary School Centenary Celebrations have been postponed until 15th & 16th October 2022.

The Camperdown P & A Society's 150th Show has also been postponed until October 2022.

The planning for all the events is in place, just waiting until everyone is allowed to attend.

On the upside - our volunteers are now permitted back at the Heritage Centre, with Covid restrictions of course.
It was a very happy team back working and catching up yesterday.

We were also fortunate to be able to hold our scheduled AGM with a small gathering at which Jennifer Rabach presented 'Search for the first Australian Theatre Sister'.

There's still a lot happening in the background as our volunteers continue to research and archive. If you have an hour/week (or a few) and can assist in transcribing records and petitions please get in touch - it is easy to do, can be done remotely, and adds incredible value to our digital archives. There will be a story in our next newsletter about this project.
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I am sure you are all aware how difficult this year has been in many ways, especially for holding community events.

The Milking our Memories event with Pat Walsh, planned for Sunday 3rd October is the latest in a long list to be postponed.
We are now hoping it can take place in the first half of next year. 

The Aboriginal History and Culture weekend, planned for August, has been postponed, likely until early next year.

The Robert Burns Festival postponed from July to September,  will now be held on the 1st to 3rd July, 2022.

Camperdown Secondary School Centenary Celebrations have been postponed until 15th & 16th October 2022.

The Camperdown P & A Societys 150th Show has also been postponed until October 2022.

The planning for all the events is in place, just waiting until everyone is allowed to attend.

On the upside - our volunteers are now permitted back at the Heritage Centre, with Covid restrictions of course.
It was a very happy team back working and catching up yesterday.

We were also fortunate to be able to hold our scheduled AGM with a small gathering at which Jennifer Rabach presented Search for the first Australian Theatre Sister.

Theres still a lot happening in the background as our volunteers continue to research and archive. If you have an hour/week (or a few) and can assist in transcribing records and petitions please get in touch - it is easy to do, can be done remotely, and adds incredible value to our digital archives. There will be a story in our next newsletter about this project.Image attachment

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I'm still waiting to hear back from you to the questions that I had asked. Not happy

PAST MATTERS - July Edition
Were publishing our newsletter Past Matters just a little early this month because there are many events on the way and we want to notify our members in plenty of time. Most of the events are open to the public and below youll find a list of dates and times for your diary.
The newsletter, as usual, is filled with interesting articles and information as well. Email members received it today by email; Australia Post recipients should see it in their letterboxes very soon.
We hope you enjoy it.Image attachment
ABORIGINAL HISTORY AND CULTURE
Just another poster for you about the coming seminar. Make sure you get your bookings in early. Its proving to be very popular.

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We have had a query asking if the bus tour could be a 'tag along' event as all the places are booked. Unfortunately this is not possible as there will be a commentary on the bus. Very pleasing that the tour is booked out but sorry for those who missed out on a place.

Camperdown and District: Aboriginal History and Culture seminar and bus tour. Registration for these events is NOW OPEN! Register at www.camperdownch.com.au/workshops

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We have had a query asking if the bus tour could be a 'tag along' event as all the places are booked. Unfortunately this is not possible as there will be a commentary on the bus. Very pleasing that the tour is booked out but sorry for those who missed out on a place.

The tour is hosted by Dr. Ian Clark and is currently being finalised. There are many sites within a 30km radus of Camperdown which are of great interest and have many stories associated with them. Bookings are already coming in.

Hi where can I find more info re bus tour? I’d like to have an idea of the itinerary 😊

Camperdown and District: Aboriginal History and Culture seminar and bus tour. Registration for these events is NOW OPEN! Register at ... See MoreSee Less

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Hi guys link doesn’t seem to work?

Denise Regan I’ve booked in for the Saturday. Do you want to come?

CAN YOU HELP CAMPERDOWN ROTARY?
In 1959 a commemorative pennant was produced to celebrate the visi to Camperdown of Princess Alexandra, and Camperdown Rotary would love to find one to display in the Clocktower. Do you have one hidden away in a box somewhere? Did your mother, or perhaps even your grandmother keep one of these pennants as a memento? We have a photo of the pennant and also one of the Mayor of the day, Cr. F. A. Robertson, farewelling the Princess at Camperdown railway station. The pennant says: Welcome to Camperdown, Victoria. Princess Alexandra of Kent.
Start looking in those bottom drawers!Image attachment

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We were only allowed to stand on Cressy Street( the town side of the railway line) and wave flags that we were given.The train headed off towards Melbourne The Princess waved to us and we waved back.Big day for Camperdown.

I don’t have a pennant but vividly remember travelling on the train from Timboon to see Princess Alexandra!

I don’t have a pennant, but I do still have my invitation to a luncheon for Princess Alexandra in 1959 at Red Cross House in Malvern. Jill Shepherd and I represented Camperdown State School.

I was only talking about this visit the other day, I was a member of the choir.🤗

I was there. Have a photo with my teddy bear on my 3rd birthday waiting to see her.

I have no one in a box somewhere. Princess Alexandra came to our church

Lorraine Browne

Tammy Discher

MURDERING GULLY
Following our previous post, we have had an enquiry from local resident, Jimmy Lane, asking about the location of this infamous site. A very comprehensive article has been written by CDHS Life Member, Bob Lambell and, because it is such an important subject, we have decided to post this online rather than as a private ‘message’. Bob’s article follows:
Yes, Jimmy, there is a little confusion about the location of the Murdering Gully massacre in early 1839. However there is no doubt that it occurred on Mount Emu Creek, then known as Taylor's River, at a junction with a small tributary. The spot is not marked, but oral and written history has long suggested a site on private land about 10 km south of Darlington. The tributary leading to the massacre site is located by a fairly steep dip in the Camperdown-Darlington Road. A dry creek bed heads south-west from this point to join Mount Emu Creek about 2 km distant.
In her book "On Mount Emu Creek" published in 1969, noted historian Mary Turner Shaw described the location of the massacre site as follows: "One is reluctant to admit that one of the ugliest incidents of all is supposed to have happened only a mile or two upstream from the 'bank of the honeysuckles' at a place still remembered as Murdering Gully". The 'bank of the honeysuckles' she refers to is better known as the site of the Kilnoorat cemetery, which overlooks Mount Emu Creek.
In the same book there is a map of the property 'Wooriwyrite' dated 1900, that clearly shows the location of the Murdering Gully tributary and where it joins Mount Emu Creek (see map below).
The site of the Murdering Gully massacre is unmarked and difficult to access, but fortunately the incident is very well documented. In his paper "Scars on the Landscape" published in 1995, Dr Ian D Clark details the massacre and its aftermath in considerable depth. Here is a link to Dr Clark's paper. See pages 105-118: http://nationalunitygovernment.org/pdf/2014/…
The perpetrator of the massacre was Frederick Taylor and this link to a Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… gives a detailed history of Taylor.
On the path to reconciliation, it is incumbent on all of us to learn about and acknowledge such terrible incidents and past injustices to the Aboriginal people.
On the weekend of 7th and 8th August, the Camperdown & District Historical Society, together with Camperdown Community House, will conduct a seminar and tour about the history and culture of the local Aboriginal people. Details and booking procedures will be posted soon on the Camperdown Community House website:
Our society will also be publicising it here and in our newsletter, "Past Matters", due out towards the end of July.
... See MoreSee Less

MURDERING GULLY
Following our previous post, we have had an enquiry from local resident, Jimmy Lane, asking about the location of this infamous site. A very comprehensive article has been written by CDHS Life Member, Bob Lambell and, because it is such an important subject, we have decided to post this online rather than as a private ‘message’. Bob’s article follows:  
Yes, Jimmy, there is a little confusion about the location of the Murdering Gully massacre in early 1839. However there is no doubt that it occurred on Mount Emu Creek, then known as Taylors River, at a junction with a small tributary. The spot is not marked, but oral and written history has long suggested a site on private land about 10 km south of Darlington. The tributary leading to the massacre site is located by a fairly steep dip in the Camperdown-Darlington Road. A dry creek bed heads south-west from this point to join Mount Emu Creek about 2 km distant.
In her book On Mount Emu Creek published in 1969, noted historian Mary Turner Shaw described the location of the massacre site as follows:  One is reluctant to admit that one of the ugliest incidents of all is supposed to have happened only a mile or two upstream from the bank of the honeysuckles at a place still remembered as Murdering Gully. The bank of the honeysuckles she refers to is better known as the site of the Kilnoorat cemetery, which overlooks Mount Emu Creek.
In the same book there is a map of the property Wooriwyrite dated 1900, that clearly shows the location of the Murdering Gully tributary and where it joins Mount Emu Creek  (see map below).
The site of the Murdering Gully massacre is unmarked and difficult to access, but fortunately the incident is very well documented. In his paper Scars on the Landscape published in 1995, Dr Ian D Clark details the massacre and its aftermath in considerable depth. Here is a link to Dr Clarks paper. See pages 105-118:  http://nationalunitygovernment.org/pdf/2014/IanDClark-Scars_in_the_landscape.pdf.pdf
The perpetrator of the massacre was Frederick Taylor and this link to a Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Taylor_(colonist) gives a detailed history of Taylor.
On the path to reconciliation, it is incumbent on all of us to learn about and acknowledge such terrible incidents and past injustices to the Aboriginal people.
On the weekend of 7th and 8th August, the Camperdown & District Historical Society, together with Camperdown Community House, will conduct a seminar and tour about the history and culture of the local Aboriginal people. Details and  booking procedures will be posted soon on the Camperdown Community House website: www.camperdownch.com.au
Our society will also be publicising it here and in our newsletter, Past Matters, due out towards the end of July.

Comment on Facebook

Camperdown and District: Aboriginal History and Culture seminar and bus tour. Registration for these events is NOW OPEN! Register at www.camperodwnch.com.au/workshops

Would be great to have the site recognised if that’s what Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council wanted and the land owner was ok with it.

We cannot change the past, but we can acknowledge and remember the truth of what so unjustly happened. That's the least we could do for the families that were murdered that night, and to hide, ignore or deny it continues the evil that was done. Its a pity the landowner doesn't realise what an important role they could play in this. Maybe one day it will happen.

I remember we were told about this at school. 79 - 80?? Either grade 6 or form 1. As a part of local history. Details were a bit vague but the meaning was there. Was never taught as a race thing but as humanitarian. Treat others as you want to be treated.

I have been to that site on private land with Father Dennis some years ago. It seems so peaceful and unremarkable a spot but you can imagine men women and children there peacefully asleep by the creek whilst Taylor and his murderous drunks walked their horses as quietly as possible up the small hill looking down on the sleeping families. From there they rode into them killing everything in their path.

The truth wasn’t told to us st school. It’s awful, grim and murderous, but it must be acknowledged and accepted how ever confronting.

Thank you for the article,, most informative and brought back memories of my friend Gwenny Fox that we used to take to Darlington to see her son Peter,when we got to gully near where Tom Austin used to live, she would mention “murdering gully “ not sure if this concurs with your map and info.

I remember reading a reference to a massacre on a sign on the Lake Terang walk. There is also a description about this massacre on the Frontier Wars website

It would be interesting to no about lake colongulac and the aboriginal remains, marsupial lion, Tasman tiger and devils bones, that were found

My brother Ken and I have been having a look at this and we believe the actual site is just off Kilnoorat Road North. I have visited the site and it is completely unmarked

My Dad took me there as a child and told me the story. Dad was born in 1918.

It's so sad that such events happened here... and still happen in other parts of the world. No life is worth more than another.

Thank you for this article. I have heard about this but had no idea as to where the site was.

Honey suckle is a paddock on Iramoo . Has always been named that. Father Denis had a prayer group on the property some years ago to pray for the souls at Iramoo. Brian Haigh took them down to the creek location

Clarke's version of events including the location also conforms to a flat on the creek south of the McKinnon Bridge. Isabella Dawson in her book on her local people-wrongly ascribed to James her father-also mentions the Kilnoorat site. Part of the location problem has been the insistence on using Glenormiston as the location, when it was on Strathdownie, McKillop and Smith's run. The massacre occurred when Niel Black was on the high seas between Greenoch and Cape Town. Anotheer problem with ther story is the story of a woman swimming the creek and then swimming Bullenmerri to escape pursuers. There are several other examples of the same thing, I know of two from South Australia; one across Backstairs Passage to the mainland by a woman to escape sealers on Kangaroo Island, the second the woman swam across the lakes at the mouth of the Murray to escape. Both had babies strapped to them, and in the former instance both woman and child died. The problem with the Bullenmerri incident is the lakes were close to full at the time-Bullenmerri and Gnotuk joined briefly in the early 1840s-so swimming across the lake would have been no escape at all from men on horseback. Btw on the map you can see the boundary line marking the northern limits on GlenO: it is the diagonal line from bottom left of the map to the creek. The Australian database om massacres will not change some of the details of the massacre. Their text is ambiguous in location and wrong in some elements. Some other of their sites are almost completely erroneous, Elliston in SA in particular. You have to do research in good 19th and 20th c sources to get any where near the truth.

This is a very horrible interesting part of history. I've never heard of this before thankyou for sharing.

Thanks for sharing the publication

Deborah Leanne

The few survivors were tracked to the then timbered point of land on the west side of Bullen Merri. And here starts the story of bareetch churneen (queen fanny) From the book journey to aboriginal Victoria by Aldo massola.

Bree Isles

Molly Matilda

Thank you for the story!

Kathy Hunt

Riki

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